Yummy griddled chicken with sweet potato and purple sprouting broccoli

Hooray for these lighter days and all the pretty blossom on the trees. Given leaving the house with my two little ones is still an ordeal, I’m overjoyed that afternoons in the big garden are now feasible (on my first attempt at a picnic in March, it took us 40 mins to get out, a bird promptly pooed all over Finny including his hands… then it started to hail!). The two ancient cherry blossoms are in full bloom and we love lying underneath them making wishes.

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As I keep saying there are lots of recipes I keep meaning to add here. By a mile the yummiest thing we’ve eaten recently is this delicious griddled chicken. It’s a Lewis recipe (if I haven’t made it obvious, most of the best recipes on this blog are from Lewis and he does a lot of the cooking also! Thanks Lewis!! SuperChef!). It’s our version of the flattened chicken in my current favourite cookbook: Kitchen Memories and we have it with purple sprouting broccoli and sweet potato as suggested by the book (following their recipe), although it would be great with anything – in a hot chicken sandwich, with rice – it’s super versatile. You can leave the chilli out for kids. This recipe also works with grilled chicken thighs (pictured below)

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Yummy griddled chicken

  • 1 or 2 flattened chicken fillets (get the butcher to batter the chicken to about 1cm thickness or do it yourself)
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 lemon cut into wedges
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme and/or rosemary leaves
  • Chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and sliced into quarters lengthways
  • 3 smashed garlic gloves, no skin
  • 1 tsp dried red chilli flakes (optional)
  • Sour cream (optional)
  • 2 chopped fresh red chillis (optional)
  • Salt and pepper
  • Purple sprouting broccoli

Marinade the chicken in the olive oil, herbs, half the lemon juice. Season with pepper (not salt) and leave covered for about an hour.

Preheat the oven to 180C. Put the sweet potato in a baking dish with the garlic, thympe leaves, pinch of dried chilli and enough olive oil to coat them and season. Bake for 35-40 mins turning occasionally. They should be slightly caramelised on the edges when done.

Parboil the broccoli for about 2 mins, drain then toss with olive oil and season. Or lightly fry a clove of garlic in olive oil, add the parboiled broccoli and fry for a couple of mins adding a good squeeze of lemon and salt and pepper. Both ways are nice.

Heat the griddle pan until smoking hot. Season the chicken with salt, place on the hot griddle and leave to cook for 4 mins then turn and cook for another 4 – 5 mins. Check it’s done then remove from the heat and leave to rest for a few mins.

Serve the chicken with the sweet potato and broccoli and a wedge of lemon. If you want add a spoonful of sour cream and scatter the fresh chilli and parsley over the top.

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Beef stew

Beef stew, beef stew, whatcha gonna do? Whatcha gonna do when beef stew comes for you… This was a massive in joke with my boss back when I had a 9-5 office job. At random times, including at big meetings, he’d pick a word from the current conversation and ‘whatcha gonna do’ it. For example ‘business plan, business plan, whatcha gonna do when business plan comes for you’ and so on. We thought it was hilarious. Our co-workers perhaps, at times, found it a bit wearing. Ha ha ha us. (If this is completely baffling watch this… specifically 0:24… see what we did there?)

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So… beef stew! I know two recipes for this. One my mum taught me which is a variation of her lamb casserole but with beef instead of lamb and a tin of petit pois instead of flageolet beans (can I just add that tinned peas are utterly delicious. Lewis loooves them and they are very common in France and Spain, less so here I think. A fab Spanish recipe is to fry some bacon or slivers of jamon serrano with a little garlic and maybe some onion, add the drained tin of peas and a little stock and fresh parsley – delicious with a fried egg.)

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As my mum’s stew is quite rich and I’m still craving light and healthy foods (not long now, due date 9th December, eek!) I plumped for this one instead. The recipe is from Jane Clarke’s Yummy Baby book which is full of baby and toddler friendly recipes for the whole family. I’m a big fan of this book, my squash and feta salad is from Yummy Baby and so is my staple daal that hopefully I’ll post here soon. This stew is a little lighter with more veggies. I love it and so clearly does Lexie. We made it the other day for the first time this year. Her response as follows: “It’s good,” pause, “it’s super yummy,” another pause. “I really like this… ooh look a carrot sausage!” More pausing, “Thank you for making this mummy.” !!!

Beef stew

Prep time: 5-10 mins
Cooking time: 3 hours
Budget: £10-15 (£5 beef, £7 wine, £1 mushrooms, £1 courgettes, £1.50 shallots, £1 celery, £2 bacon)
Ease: Easy
Serves 4-6 Ingredients:

  • 800g braising or stewing beef in large pieces
  • Olive oil
  • 50g diced bacon or pancetta
  • 12 shallots, peeled but left whole (or 1 chopped onion)
  • 2 sticks roughly chopped celery
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and thickly sliced
  • 4 chopped garlic cloves
  • 750ml red wine
  • 1 tbp tomato puree
  • 1 bouquet garni (sprigs of rosemary, thyme and flat leafed parsley)
  • 12 mushrooms, sliced if large
  • 2 medium courgettes thickly sliced
  • Pepper

Preheat the oven to 180C/300F/Gas 2. Season the beef with ground black pepper and heat olive oil in a frying pan on a high heat. Fry the beef in batches until well browned then put in a casserole dish, like a Le Creuset. Add a little more olive oil to the frying pan and add the bacon, shallots, celery and carrots, frying until golden. Add the garlic, cook for another min, then tip everything into the casserole dish. Put the frying pan back on the heat and pour in half the red wine. Bring the the boil and scrap up all the bits at the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon. Pour this into the casserole, adding the rest of the wine, the tomato puree and the bouquet garni. On the hob, bring the stew to the boil then cover with the lid and cook in the oven for 1 1/2 hours. Then add the sliced courgettes and the mushrooms and put back into the oven for another 1 1/2 hours. Once done, the meat will be wonderfully soft and should fall apart on the fork. For extra veg you can add a few frozen peas before serving and some fresh parsley to garnish. This is delicious with boiled potatoes, or rice, or some buttered pasta.

Steak tacos/burritos

A long hiatus I know. I’m about 4 months pregnant and my first trimester saw me completely reject ‘screens’ – no blog, no instagram, no facebook. This would have been a Very Good Thing were I not sick as a dog. Thankfully it passed early, around 8 weeks, and I’m having a lovely pregnancy now, very mellow and relaxed. I’m also back on fish in a big way! So happy about this as I went off seafood massively when pregnant with Lexie. With her all I wanted was cheese and ham toasties, burgers and pies!

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This baby seems to want citrus, chilli and fish and I’m really craving Mexican food. So far I’ve made carnitas which I’ll share another day (I roasted pork belly instead of braising pork leg – nice but I’d like to try the braised version), yummy fish tacos and my current fave – these delicious steak tacos.

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The recipe (and pic above) is from Mexican Food Made Simple (though I do my own fresh tomato salsa and guacamole and add to the refried beans). I’m not a huge fan of the Wahaca restaurants but so far all the recipes I’ve made from this book have been good. I love the refried beans in particular. Even though the steak is marinated with chilli it isn’t spicy and was fine for my toddler to eat. I tend to do one chilli free salsa for Lexie and give her slices of avocado, which she prefers, instead of guacamole. It’s also good to serve with some fresh orange juice (or a mix of orange and grapefruit juice which I love with ice and sprigs of mint!) as vitamin C helps to absorb the iron from the meat.

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This is not a ‘use up the cupboard’ dinner and there are some specialist Mexican ingredients worth buying. Also, as there are a few salsas and sides to make, it’s best prepped with napping children, or on the weekend when the adult:child ratio improves! It’s a ‘lots of little bowls’ on the table meal so bear this in mind if you don’t fancy washing lots of dishes after!

I think it’s the most complicated recipe I’ve ever written up due to all the components. Tacos are definitely quicker than the burritos and I often make a much simplified version of this recipe with just steak, spring onions, fresh tomato salsa and guacamole – takes about 30 mins, no specialist ingredients needed and totally delicious so please don’t feel overwhelmed by this long recipe! There is an easier way to make it!!

If you want to go the whole shebang I recommend printing this off (print button should be below) and reading it with a cold beer a week before you make it! Preferably listening to this soundtrack. And definitely make the chipotle salsa and beans in advance. As faffy as it is making all these sides, because some of them keep well, they do make instant other meals (nachos or just rice with refried beans/salsa/cheese/sour cream etc) so it’s nice having them in the fridge.

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Sorry there are no pictures of the actual meal – it’s my first post in ages and I’m a bit slow on the take – I’ll update with real photos when I next make this. Instead here are nice pictures of Lexie enjoying this summer. I feel like I should write an update on her and what we’ve been up to but this is a long recipe so I’ll let the photos speak for us!

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Steak tacos

Steak

  • 600g butterfly cut onglet steak – we got this from the butcher. Original recipe calls for thin skirt steaks
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • Juice of 1/2 an orange
  • 1 finely chopped chilli de arbol
  • Salt and pepper

Refried beans (optional)

  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 chopped white onion
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 chopped cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 chile de arbol chopped (optional)
  • 1 tbsp chopped coriander stalks or 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano

Then either a tin of black beans (or any beans – pinto/borlotti are good and taste great refried) OR cooked black beans. If doing the cooked version

  • 250g dried black beans 
  • 4 bashed cloves of garlic
  • A few sprigs of thyme (optional – I’ve never used)
  • A few bay leaves
  • A little chicken or veg stock (1/2 cube)
  • Espazote (comes with this black bean kit) (optional, I’ve made delicious beans without it)
  • 1 onion cut in 1/4s
  • 1 tbsp salt

Chipotle salsa (this is amazing!!) (optional)

  • 4 plum tomatoes
  • 2 cloves unpeeled garlic
  • 1 tbsp chopped coriander
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 white onion in 1/4s
  • 1 or 2 tbsp chipotles en adobo

Fresh tomato salsa (optional)

  • 4 chopped vine or plum tomatos
  • 1/2 crushed garlic clove
  • 1 chopped spring onion
  • Handful of chopped coriander
  • 1 chopped birdseye chilli (red or green or both!) (omit for kiddies)
  • Olive oil to taste – 2 tbsp approx
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp salt to taste
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp sugar to taste
  • Juice of 1/2 lime to taste

Guacamole

  • 1 or 2 mashed ripe avocados
  • 1 sliced spring onion
  • 1 chopped green birdseye chilli (optional)
  • Olive oil to taste (maybe 1 tbsp)
  • Lime juice to taste (maybe 1/2 lime)
  • Salt to taste

(A speedy guacamole is just to mash avocado and add a tablespoon or two of the fresh tomato salsa and mix. Or just have slices of avocado a la Lexie.)

Other ingredients

  • Corn tortillas – little ones for tacos, big ones for burritos (most supermarkets sell tortillas)
  • Sour cream
  • Grated cheddar cheese (medium cheddar is good) (optional)
  • Limes
  • Chopped coriander
  • White basmati rice (optional)
  • 6 spring onions sliced into 3cm lengths
  • Kitchen towel paper

Marinate the steak in the olive oil, garlic, orange juice, chilli and seasoning for 30 mins. If having rice make it now. Prepare all the salsas and sides. The chipotle salsa and the refried beans can be made in advance as both keep well in the fridge. The guacamole and fresh tomato salsa should be prepared from scratch now. Here’s how!

For the chipotle salsa get a heavy bottomed pan and dry roast the tomatoes, onion and garlic for about 15 mins. They should blacken and keep turning them. When done, squeeze the garlic out of the skins and put in a blender along with tomatoes and onion. Add the chipotles en adobo and whizz. Put into a bowl and add the chopped coriander, salt and lime to taste. This salsa will keep for a few days to a week in the fridge and it’s bloody lovely.

For the refried beans, heat the oil in a pan and soften the onion and garlic with the spices. After 5-10 mins add the beans with either some of the cooking water, or a little water if using a can, and mush some of the beans with a masher to thicken the sauce. Season and taste. Add a little chicken or veg stock if it needs it. This will keep for up to a week in the fridge.

(If not using canned beans, soak the black beans overnight. Drain and rinse then place the beans in a pan covered in about 10cm of water. Add the garlic, herbs and onion, bring to the boil and skim off any scum on the surface. Simmer, partially covered, for 2-3 hours. Add salt to taste when the beans are done not before or it will toughen the beans up.)

For the fresh salsa and guacamole literally combine all the ingredients for each and mix. I usually do this in jars to save on having 90 bowls on the table and both will keep for a day in the fridge (but not longer really).

Once all the salsas and sides are done assemble the other ingredients. Chop coriander, slice limes, grate the cheese and open the sour cream. Warm the tortillas either by lightly dry frying each one on both sides for a few mins or by wrapping all of them in foil and placing in a warm oven for 5 mins.

Heat a griddle or heavy bottomed pan until smoking hot and add olive oil. Chop the spring onions, season with salt and pepper and put on the hot pan. Pat the steak dry with kitchen towel and add to the pan. Sear for a minute on both sides (90 secs max – this cut of beef can toughen up but is very tender if cooked quickly and served rare). Leave the beef to stand for a minute on a warm plate and finish cooking the spring onions. When done remove the onions and put on the steak plate, adding the reserved steak marinade to the pan, sizzling it up then pour into a separate bowl. Slice the steak into bite size pieces cutting across the grain. Then either add to the marinade or serve separately.

Make sure everything is on the table and then finally….. to assemble!

If having a taco place a little steak and marinade in the middle of the tortilla and dollop on top the spring onions, guacamole, chipotle salsa, sour cream and fresh coriander (you can add cheese too – I don’t). Roll up the tortilla like a wrap or fold in half making a half moon and enjoy!

If having a burrito add a little rice to the tortilla then top with steak, spring onions, guacamole, salsa, cheese and sour cream. Make a little parcel by folding in the outside edges (so tuck in the top and bottom sides then tuck in the side sides!). Roll over and eat or toast for a few minutes in a dry pan and then eat!

Serve with slices of fresh lime, ice cold beer or juice. I think slices of watermelon make a great pudding after these tacos/burritos.

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Pork chops with lemon and baked rosemary garlic potatoes

Finally, after what feels like months of rain, we are getting some bright blue skies. I’m still dreaming of escaping London… This time it’s long walks in the countryside and afternoons in front of the fire. Over the Christmas holiday we stayed with friends in their amazing Tudor home in Hampshire. We walked back from the pub across fields in the pitch black, awoke to a bright frosty morning and visited the neighbouring horses, meandering along a magical river. Tammy, our host, had a great way to keep toddlers happy on the long walks – luckily the toy fairy and the chocolate fairy were two steps ahead of us at all times leaving Max and Lexie little gifts under rocks and leaves!

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Tammy also prepared the most wonderful glazed ham with delicious sliced roast potatoes and onion for a lunch (with champagne!). I’ve been thinking about those potatoes ever since and wondering when to try them. A special deal on pork chops at my favourite butchers provided the impetus. Remembering how uplifting it was when I roasted lemon, garlic and rosemary potatoes – the incredible smells of lemon and herbs that filled our kitchen – I decided to do a take on these flavours. Not the same as a long walk in the countryside but pretty cheering nonetheless. The pork is a River Cafe recipe and the potatoes were inspired by Tammy’s using this recipe. The star of this dish was definitely the potatoes – they were amazing! The pork chop was nice but I preferred the gammon by a mile (I’m not crazy about pork chops or fillet in general – love pork belly, love ham, love bacon!).

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Pork chops with lemon and rosemary garlic potatoes

Serves 2
Prep time: 10 mins
Cooking time: 40 mins
Budget: £10-15 (£5 pork chops, 60p lemons, £1.50 herbs, £1.50 potatoes)
Ease: easy

  • 2 Pork chops
  • 1 lemon quartered
  • Salt and pepper
  • Olive oil
  • 1 stick rosemary – leaves removed and chopped
  • 3 or 4 cloves of peeled garlic
  • 3 potatoes – washed and sliced into 4 mm rounds, skin on

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Preheat the oven to 200/gas mark 6. Put the potatoes in a baking tray with a generous amount of olive oil, season and add the rosemary and garlic. They should take about 30 mins to roast, check them half way and turn.

Get a griddle pan (or heavy bottomed pan) and heat until smoking. Season the pork and smooth a little oil on both sides. Seal the meat on both sides, 2 mins per side then place in a baking tray with the lemon quarters. Squeeze one of the lemons on the pork and pop in the oven for 5 mins. After 5 mins take the meat out, baste and squidge the lemon quarters into the meat. Depending on the thickness of the pork they should take another 5-10 mins to cook but err on the side of caution and try only 5 mins first. Once done, let the meat rest covered in foil for a few minutes before serving with the potatoes and maybe some nice dijon mustard. (The reason the skin is off in the pic below is because I attempted this Jamie Oliver crackling tip – it was a failure!)

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L’amour! C’est le steak frites!

One year for Valentines we tried to be ironic and go for a curry. The joke was on us as the entire restaurant was full of heart shaped balloons and tables for two. Since then (and because I love Valentines) we stay in, have steak and chips and watch a classic movie. This year’s film was Riso Amaro which also provided the soundtrack to our evening.

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Lewis always cooks the steak ever since he attended Ginger Pig cut up a cow masterclass. He also makes the chips as per my mum’s recipe but for a change we decided to try matchstick chips! I loved them but he prefers my mums. Our usual steak of choice is rib-eye but I think I’m wavering. We had an incredible T-bone a while ago then recently a Thai ‘Crying Tiger’ sirloin that just blew me away, both challenging the rib-eye’s title as the steak of true love! Quick question: what is your favourite steak and why?

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Rib-eye steak and matchstick chips

Prep time: 10 mins
Cooking time: 30 mins
Budget: £15-20 (£12 2 rib-eye steaks, £2 potatoes, £1.50 parsley, £1.50 green salad)

  • 2 rib-eye steaks
  • 2 peeled potatoes
  • 40g softened butter
  • 1 clove crushed garlic
  • Handful of chopped parsley
  • 1 or 2 chopped anchovies
  • Sunflower oil (or groundnut oil)

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Make the butters – I like garlic and parsley so add 1 clove crushed garlic and some chopped parsley to the butter and mash it all together. Lewis likes anchovy butter – exactly the same but with some anchovy as well. Put the butter on a plate ready to serve.

To fry the steak and chips it’s a simultaneous job so make sure everything is ready! For the steaks – just before frying season with salt and pepper and brush with groundnut or sunflower oil. Heat the griddle pan (or heavy bottomed pan) until it’s very hot but not smoking. For the chips – what a palaver! Peel and chop the potatoes into matchsticks (ha ha ha) 1/4 inch thick. Rinse in cold water and pat dry with kitchen towel. Get a pan of sunflower oil really hot (mum and I are 100% convinced sunflower oil is the best oil for chips/any fried potatoes). Then you are ready to fry!

Put the chips on first, lower the potatoes into the oil. Fry until golden and crispy. Because they are so thin it should take a matter of minutes. Don’t overload the pan – we did 2 batches but the first batch went a bit soggy whereas the fresh batch were crispy and super tasty – less is more!

Fry the steaks at the same time as you put the chips on. On the high heat fry for 2 mins each side (rare) or 3-4 mins (medium rare-medium). The temperature of the pan and the thickness of the steaks will affect results but that is a general guide. Once done, set aside to rest for a few minutes on a plate covered with foil while you finish the chips. When the chips are ready remove with a slotted spoon and place on kitchen towel to absorb some of the oil. Sprinkle with salt and serve immediately! Put some of the butter on the steak so it melts into deliciousness. We followed our steaks with a simple green salad and some dark chocolate (usually we have Lewis chocolate mousse after steak but we didn’t make it in time). Voila – l’amour!

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Lamb stew with flageolet beans

We’ve gone from the wettest January in 250 years according to the press to ‘Wild Wednesday’ with ‘Red Warning’ winds hitting Britain. In the Basque country when the sea waves are this big it’s called temporal. Whenever it’s stormy here my mum tells me about how much more ‘impresionante’ temporal is in San Sebastian and how people go out of their way to witness it. So far today she’s told me about temporal at least 3 times…

We’re staying in then! I’ve a mountain of laundry to conquer (including a bag of dry clean only knitwear I just realised our machine can wash perfectly on a cold wool setting!! HIGHLIGHT OF MY DAY! NOT BEING SARCASTIC). I made a nice minestrone for our lunch and, because I remembered to marinate the meat last night, this lamb stew is currently bubbling away on the stove for our dinner, while we listen to Lena Horne’s Stormy Weather on the stereo!

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It’s one of my mum’s staples and she also does a similar stew with beef which I’ll share soon. It’s very rich and gorgeous – Lexie likes it but I give her a small portion and often water her sauce down a little. It’s also another brown recipe from me! I’m turning into the brown pot lady! I’ve got a bright orange butternut squash tagine coming up as well as my cousin’s hake and clams in salsa verde. This blog will soon be a rainbow I promise! (Couldn’t resist this pic again!)

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Lamb stew with flageolet beans

Prep time: 10 mins plus 4 hours + marinating time
Cooking time: 2-4 hours
Budget: £10 (£4 lamb neck, 60p onion, 30p carrot, £1 rosemary, £2 tin flageolet beans, £2 bacon)
Ease: easy
Serves 4

  • 2 pieces of lamb neck fillet or similar cut of lamb for stewing – cut into pieces
  • 1 white onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 carrot, peeled and sliced
  • 1/4 stick celery, sliced
  • 2 tbsp roughly of olive oil
  • 2 big glasses of red wine
  • 1 stick of rosemary
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 carrot
  • 2 rashers streaky bacon, chopped
  • 1 stock cube – chicken, lamb or veg
  • Plain flour for dusting lamb
  • Salt and pepper
  • Tin of flageolet beans

Marinate the meat for 4 hours or ideally overnight in some olive oil (2 tbpsn), a big glass of red wine, salt and pepper, garlic cloves and a stick of rosemary.

Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pan (I used a Le Creuset). Take the lamb pieces out of the marinade, reserving the liquid to add to the stew later, dust lightly in flour and place into the hot oil. I used to be crap at browning meat – the trick is, as Hugh Fearnley says: “Remember you are looking to burn…” This info from his MEAT cookbook is the business:

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Once the meat is browned, set aside on a plate and add a big splash of wine to the pan. Turn the heat up and use a spatula to scrape up or ‘deglaze’ all the meaty bits. After a couple of minutes pour the winey bits into the marinade.

Put more oil in the pan, heat then add the onion, carrot, celery and bacon. Season and cook gently for ages to make the sofrito (very softened onions, not browned). When the sofrito is ready add the meat and juices that have been released while it’s been resting. Then add the marinade liquid keeping the garlic cloves but removing and chucking the stick of rosemary. Add a bay leaf, the stock cube and top up with lots of water – the lamb should be well covered. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 2-4 hours. From time to time check it’s not drying out and if it is just add more water. 10 mins before serving open, drain and rinse the flageolet beans and add to the stew. Season to taste and serve with lots of fresh crusty white bread. This stew is also nice with boiled new potatoes instead of flageolet beans or even rice – but not chips or roast tatties!! Nooo – it’s too rich for them!

(Here’s a pic of our sole outing of the day at dusk so Lexie could have a scoot around the square and look at the moon!)

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EDIT: We’ve just eaten the stew – it was bloody amazing!

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Veal saltimbocca

Here is the recipe for veal saltimbocca I made a few nights ago. ‘Saltimbocca’ means ‘jump into the mouth’ and given how tired I am right now I’d be so grateful if my food did just cook itself, jump into my mouth and then wash up after thanks! I talked about the inspiration behind this recipe here and got the veal from the Ginger Pig so it was top quality and ethical. We only tend to buy one cut of meat a week which makes it easier to justify the expense of a good quality butcher.

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A while ago we went through a veal milanese phase (breaded veal escalope) but decided we prefer chicken milanese because it tastes nicer. I’m so happy to discover a new way to cook veal that suits better it’s luxurious taste and tender texture. A huge thank you to Mimi Thorisson for the recipe! Lexie loved her ‘maybe tiny little’ (her words) piece she had with mushroom tagliatelle. We had ours with roast potatoes and mushrooms. I think next time I’ll make extra sauce and serve the saltimbocca with rice, a green salad and some lemon wedges.

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Veal saltimbocca

Prep time: 5 mins
Cooking time: 10-15 mins
Budget: £10-15 (veal £7, ham £3, sage £1.50)

  • Very thin veal escalopes (ask the butcher to batter them for you)
  • Flour for dusting
  • A slice of prosciutto or parma ham per escalope
  • Fresh sage leaves
  • 4 or 5 tbsp good quality stock – veal or beef or chicken – try and use real stock. I love my stock cubes but they don’t work well for this sauce
  • Butter
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 glass white wine

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Preheat the oven to 180/gas mark 4. Dust the escalopes with flour. Add a generous amount of butter and olive oil to a fry pan and heat until sizzling. Fry the veal for 15 seconds on both sides then season and add some sage leaves. Pour in the wine and cook for 2 more minutes. Then remove the veal and put into a baking tray. Add the stock to the frying pan, mix and cook for 3 minutes. Place a slice of prosciutto on each escalope, pour the sauce on top, add a few more sage leaves and bake in the oven for 8-10 minutes.

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